Reading Review: First Person and other stories, by Ali Smith

Ali Smith is another universe I’m taking a brisk walk through. I accidentally didn’t finish The Accidental – I started it on holiday with way too little time, strife of a reader, right? It’s hard to know where to start with writers like her, every time I get the thought to read her work, she seems to have a new book out. So, where to start… I was first introduced to her short fiction, so The First Person and other stories seems like the best idea.

I’d describe Smith as a zany Cormac McCarthy, without American reference points. She treats the page in a similar way to McCarthy; no punctuation above letters, no ‘ or ” to be found. The prose is bleach-clean. Dialogue relies solely the reader’s attention, the speech only distinguishable by the line breaks and the odd ‘he says… she says…’ It’s ergonomic, but unlike McCarthy, Smith delves into snapshots of human lives with a swift in/out, yet burdens your heart with each story. McCarthy paints desolate landscapes where you fight to choose humanity or abandonment or inevitable doom. These are writers of gravitational fields. Sink wisely. Smith is funnier, too. But enough with comparisons.

Good short stories for me shut out your ability to read anything else for a period of time. Smith’s world is a slow place to find your bearings, but I was immersed after two stories in this book and living with characters that I could hate/love/fear with ease. Smith interrogates person and tense in ways I’m not sure I even understand yet. She’s not afraid to leap perspective and drop you elsewhere in the turn of a line. I want call it poetry… but that’s what poets do to narrative.

There is commentary in many of these stories on how to write a story. The opener, ‘True short story,’ charts Smith’s attempt to write a short story while she edits it over in conversations with her friend who is fighting cancer. In the final pages, she even lists quotes from short story giants, my favourites being:

‘Jorge Luis Borges says that short stories can be the perfect form for novelists too lazy to write anything longer than fifteen pages.’

‘Alice Munro says that every short story is at least two short stories.’

My favourite story in the collection would have to be ‘No exit’ in terms of its character’s neurotic sprawl and how that comes to affect their everyday dialogue and interactions with the world. Smith weaves a fire exit metaphor in the story both in physicality in the character’s world and the reader’s mind. It’s a pathway story that sets up so many beginnings and endings that are all driven by character obsession. It took me a while to exit the story and get back into my body.

Smith’s writing is a constant diversion to then draw you into her key themes. There are times where I got lost and that can be a turn off in narrative, but if you can trust Smith’s writing, you will have learnt something from the path she led you down.

Ali Smith, The First Person And Other Stories, Hamish and Hamilton, 2008

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2 thoughts on “Reading Review: First Person and other stories, by Ali Smith

  1. It looks interesting. Gonna give it a try. I do agree with you on what you say about short stories; they get us hooked. George Saunders and Tao Lin did that for me.

    Thank you for the review

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